Art Supply Organization – Paint

Art Supply Organization – Paint

Addressing the challenge of having lots and lots and lots of paint tubes

How many times did I try to figure out how to store my paint? How many pinterest pins and google searches did I explore trying to solve my problems? SO MANY! No doubt you have been in the same position. Art supply organization is hard. Really hard! Everything I found either involves buying racks, using pegboard that takes up a ton of space, or having filing drawers with custom inserts… I’ve seen it all.

For years I used a toolbox. It was portable, but nothing was easy to find. Everything was on top of everything else, and there was no way to sort by color or soft/heavy/etc.

I don’t believe you should have to spend a lot of money to solve this problem. I am firm in my believe that the solution should be elegant. Let me introduce to you my ultra minimalist art supply organization storage system for my paint.

paint organization for wall
How I store my acrylic paint in my studio

Neat, right? It’s up on the wall, visible, I can sort by color (If I wanted to) and I never have to dig through a bin or drawer to find what color I need. It’s ultra low cost, as I had this wood hanging around in my garage as scrap. I believe this should probably cost no more than $5 in materials, especially if you already have a drill, nails, screws, and wood.

Here’s how to make your own

What you need

  • 1″ Nails
  • Screws (for attaching to wall)
  • Wood – I used 1×3″ boards
  • Paint (optional)

Instructions

So, I measured the space I had – there were already two posters on the wall and I wanted to use the space below. That came out to approximately 26″ wide. I cut two pieces of wood to this length and then measured for the paint tubes. Placing them side by side and approximating really helped, especially if you are using a different brand or have different sizes of tubes. My nails are spaced approximately 2″ apart. Your results may vary, but I wouldn’t go any closer than that. Besides, measuring every 2″ is *very* easy.

paint organization
Here’s what the board looks like without any paint hanging on it

Because I want the paint to hang nicely and place the boards closer together on the wall I decided to put the nails in 1/4 of the width down from the top of the board. You can see from the pictures that they aren’t nailed in along the center line. After this I drilled a screw on each end of the board so that I could fasten it directly to the wall. Your paint tubes will likely cover the screw. I drilled a countersink so the screw would be flush with the wood, but that was an aesthetic choice. It’s completely up to you!

Finally, every painter’s favorite part, color! You could leave the boards au natural, stain, or paint them. I chose to paint them. I watered down some acrylic paint and applied it directly to the wood without priming it. It gave the wood a lot of character while still showing off the grain.

There it is! If you have any other interest in DIY painting related projects please check out my other post on making a Still Life Shadow Box.

I hope you’ve found this helpful – if you do please let me know in the comments and show me your version! How have you solved organizing your art supplies?

Last painting of 2016

Last painting of 2016

My last painting of 2016 was completed on December 31.

What do I circle back to? A blender, of course. Acrylic on Ampersand Gessobord- one of the most responsive materials that I have ever used. Rosemary Brushes and Gessobord are a match made in heaven!

This year I’m going to try to sell more art. Last year I sold three pieces without putting too much effort in, so this year I’m going to hustle.

I’ve reopened my Etsy, just waiting on a name change to finalize.

In my personal life I’ve got a few updates – my husband and I just moved from San Jose to Redwood City to shorten our commutes by 45 minutes each way. I can bike to work, and we just built a portfolio carrier for my bicycle based on this Instructable which should work really well! I’ll be taking a figure drawing class through Stanford Continuing Studies this next quarter.

When we moved we ditched the TV and it’s been a month. I haven’t missed it yet.

 

Selling Art – Thoughts

Selling Art – Thoughts

After thinking about it for a while I’ve decided to split my Instagram account. My goal with my account is to share my paintings. Not everyone wants to see pictures of me flexing or AT&T Park, but I’m sure that some people do. My Instagram @kathendrixart will now only have art. Having the two separated will give me more opportunities to post for each. Deadlifts and squats on one, paintings on the other.

I’ve amassed quite a number of paintings and it’s about time that they get a new home. I’m exploring how I can best sell them – etsy? ebay?

I’m not sure if dailypaintworks is a good place to sell. I want to know the metrics, see what sells, for how much, etc. I’m not sure how much my art is worth to others. Would others agree with what I think my art should be priced? I suppose I won’t find out until I try.

Still life box: Part 2

Still life box: Part 2

I’d like to expand a little more on the still life setup box that I made.

It was inspired by Carol Marine‘s instructions for a still life shadow box. Her dimensions differed from mine a little – I had Lowes help me out and cut down the plywood to 18×18″ and based all of my other dimensions off of that.

The height does measure a few inches more than the width of 18″, which means it can accommodate for vases and larger dioramas. I was able to find a clip on lamp at a local thrift store which cut the price by $10-15. The whole project ended up costing about $110 and a day and a half of my time.

It really makes a difference to be able to look at something in front of you and really see the way light changes your subject rather than working from a photograph. Working from life will also give me a better understanding of how objects and volumes relate to each other in space.

The box is lit from a warm flood light as well as a cool CFL. Colors and shadows are so much more interesting now.

The 18″ depth/width offers an interesting flexibility in the fact that a lot of flooring options are available in 18×18 (see Home Depot’s site if you don’t know what I am talking about). I picked up two “slate” effect vinyl tiles to work as an alternate to drapery for my shadow box. Best of all it was less than $4 for the both of them.

All I have to do is put one on the bottom and lean one on the back. It’s pretty convincing, and I could pick up different tiles if I wanted. I had thought about ceramic tiles but the weight would not work at this point in time, as the box is not secured to the stand that it is on. Perhaps in the future.

On a side note, it’s important to think about process. I dove in to my first project with this box without underpainting. I was so excited to start that I completely forgot about the process. If you do not follow a process paintings can take much longer. I found myself struggling with the draping in the painting, but I think it’s turned out fine. I’ll post it tomorrow – keep an eye out for it.

Still life setup box

image
Still Life PVC Box – so easy to make!

I spent yesterday making a still life shadow box for painting. The plywood is 18×18″ and secured to the 3/4″ PVC with zip ties. I bought some lightbulbs and clamp on lamps and will finish assembly today hopefully. I still need to buy some white fabric and a power strip for the lights.